Could Climate Change Affect Your Next Happy Hour?

Will the new Napa be in Wyoming? Will Champagne lose out to Southern England? How a warming planet may shift the balance, and the industry.

Event Details

Location

swissnex San Francisco
730 Montgomery St., San Francisco, 94111 United States

Date

July 31, 2014 from 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm America/Los Angeles (UTC-07:00)

Cost

$20 Advance Purchase, $25 At the Door

What makes a great wine? This is something the wine industry agonizes over, yet almost everyone agrees that the delicate balance of acidity and sugar are key. It’s what makes the difference between a table wine and a masterpiece.

So what happens when this carefully developed balance shifts, as temperature rises with global climate change? Are we going to drink sparkling wine from Southern England instead of from Champagne, France? Will the new Napa Valley be in Wyoming? Science suggests this might be so.

Join the discussion at swissnex San Francisco around climate change and the wine industry on July 31, followed by a tasting of wines from areas likely to be affected: England, Germany, and Turkey.

Program

6:30 pm   doors open
7:00 pm   presentations by Gregory Jones and René Roger
8:00 pm   audience Q&A
8:30 pm   wine tasting and reception
9:30 pm   doors close

Bios

Gregory Jones

rsz_gregoryjonesGregory Jones is a professor and research climatologist at Southern Oregon University in the Department of Environmental Studies. He serves as Director of the Division of Business, Communication and the Environment and specializes in the study of climate structure and suitability for viticulture, as well as in how climate variability and change influence grapevine growth, wine production, and quality.
Jones conducts applied research for the grape and wine industry in Oregon and has given hundreds of international, national, and regional presentations on climate and wine-related research. He is the author of numerous book chapters, including a contribution to the 2008 Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Report. He was named to Decanter Magazine’s 2009 Power List representing the top 50 most influential people in the world of wine, named the Oregon Wine Press’s 2009 Wine Person of the Year, and has been in the top 100 most influential people in the US wine industry in 2012 and 2013 (intowine.com).

 

 René Roger

rené rogerRené Roger is Professor of Oenology and Beverage Management at the Ecole Hoteliere de Lausanne (EHL), in Switzerland, and he teaches as an EHL representative in Washington State University’s Executive Master’s program. He holds a master’s degree in wine management from the University of Paris X, as well as a master’s in wine business from the Organisation internationale de la vigne et du vin (OIV). He also holds a certification in beverage management from Cornell University.
Roger began his professional career as a sommelier in some of the most prestigious hotels and restaurants in Europe. He continues to be actively involved in the sector, with ongoing consulting projects including speaking at major wine events, workshops for hotels and restaurants, guidance on cellar investments and wine lists, and advising wineries.

 

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