Handshake: Robotics and Intuitive Interaction [Recording]

The third public event in the Handshake series on robotics and human interaction is a collaboration between swissnex Boston and the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan.

Visual by Emmanuel Crivelli

Event Details

Location

Online Event

Date

Wednesday, June 17, 2020
05:30am to 06:30am in San Francisco 02:30pm to 03:30pm in Switzerland
09:30pm to 10:30pm in Japan

Cost

Free. RSVP below.

Handshake: A Interactive Robotic Installation, was initiated by swissnex Boston and AATB, in close collaboration with the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York, the Swiss Federal Office of Culture, and swissnex San Francisco. This project and its global reach were made possible by the generous support of the global swissnex network, Présence Suisse, and Pro Helvetia.

The third public event in the Handshake series on robotics and human interaction is a collaboration between swissnex Boston and the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan.

This panel conversation will include robotics experts from Japan and the US as well as the design duo AATB from Switzerland. The panelists will discuss questions that arise around designing for intuitive Human-Computer Interaction systems and how human-robot collaboration is impacting human social interaction now and in the future.

This early-morning event on the East Coast of the US is simultaneously a late-evening event for our Japanese audiences and will truly bridge cultures and continents around these universal questions relating to our future with technology.

  • Masahiko Inami, Ph.D. — Advisor to the President, Professor, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo
  • Kate Darling — Leading expert in Robot Ethics. Researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab

Join us for this session on Zoom for an inspiring and dynamic conversation!

Program

San Francisco
05:30am — Welcome by swissnex Boston and the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan
05:40am — Intro and Panel Discussion with AATB, Prof. Masahiko Inami and Dr. Kate Darling
06:10am — Q&A with Audience
06:30am — Closing Remarks and End

Switzerland
02:30pm — Welcome by swissnex Boston and the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan
02:40pm — Intro and Panel Discussion with AATB, Prof. Masahiko Inami and Dr. Kate Darling
03:10pm — Q&A with Audience
03:30pm — Closing Remarks and End

Japan
09:30pm — Welcome by swissnex Boston and the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan
09:40pm — Intro and Panel Discussion with AATB, Prof. Masahiko Inami and Dr. Kate Darling
10:10pm — Q&A with Audience
10:30pm — Closing Remarks and End

Bios

AATB
In 2018, Andrea Anner and Thibault Brevet started a collaborative practice together. They have been informally working alongside on a number of projects but a common will to explore specific themes emerged. The practice develops around the idea of Non-Industrial Robotics: Three years ago they started experimenting with industrial robotic systems such as robotic arms and industrial automation processes. Together they develop works exploring Human-Machine Interactions through the lens of kinetic and interactive devices. The studio is currently in Residence at Atelier Luma in Arles.

AATB have been nominated for the Swiss Design Awards 2020.
Link to their site: http://www.aatb.ch/

Andrea Anner: Born in Zurich, Switzerland, graduated from ZHDK in 2008 with a BA in Visual Communication and in 2012 from ECAL with a MA in Art Direction: Type Design. Since 2014, she collaborates with Martina Perrin as Anner Perrin, a studio for Art Direction.

Thibault Brevet: Born in Lyon, France, graduated from ECAL in 2012 with a BA in Graphic Design and in 2015 with a MA in Visual Arts. He has been developing a practice at the intersection of art, engineering and design. Since 2012, he is programming websites.
Link: http://www.aatb.ch/

Kate Darling
Dr. Kate Darling is a leading expert in Robot Ethics. She’s a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, where she investigates social robotics and conducts experimental studies on human-robot interaction. Kate explores the emotional connection between people and life-like machines, seeking to influence technology design and policy direction. Her writing and research anticipate difficult questions that lawmakers, engineers, and the wider public will need to address as human-robot relationships evolve in the coming decades. Kate has a background in law & economics and intellectual property. She graduated from law school with honors and holds a doctorate of sciences from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and an honorary doctorate of sciences from Middlebury College.Kate is a former Fellow at the Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and the Yale Information Society Project, and is also an affiliate at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. Her work has been featured in Vogue, The New Yorker, The Guardian, BBC, NPR, and  PBS amongst many others. She is the caretaker for several domestic robots, including her Pleos Yochai, Peter, and Mr. Spaghetti.

Masahiko Inami
Dr. Masahiko Inami took up his current position as professor at the University of Tokyo after working at the University of Electro-Communications and Keio University. His interests include “JIZAI body editing technology,” the Augmented Human, and entertainment engineering. He has received several awards, including TIME Magazine’s “Coolest Invention of the Year” award and the Young Scientist Award from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT). He is also the co-representative of the Superhuman Sports Society and a director of the VR Consortium. His latest book is called “Birth of the Superhuman! Human Beings Beyond Science Fiction (NHK Publishing, Inc).

About the Installation

Handshake: An Interactive Robotic Installation by AATB
Live and on display May 28 – June 30, 2020

Now live, come shake virtual hands!

The physical installation consists of two robotic arms, each equipped with an over-sized hand. They are facing each other and moving together, following the directions of two people from afar. This virtual platform enables visitors to take control of the robots. The chance to control a large and complex robot with ease, no manual needed here! An interaction as simple as reaching out and shaking your own hand but with a friend across the globe.

Visitors are matched in pairs as they join the site, each remotely controlling one robotic arm in their browser in real-time via mouse and touch input. They then interact with one another aiming to shake hands, to touch.

After a certain amount of time, (depending on the amount of visitors in line) the scene is reset, and the next two visitors in the line take over control of the robots. All visitors to the website can observe this interaction between the two robots happening in real time over a live feed, as they wait on line or just view the site.

The project builds on AATB’s strong expertise in robotics systems, web development and interactive installations.

Visuals by Emmanuel Crivelli

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